Rare Bites Symposium: a Celebration of Music Manuscripts

Sydney University Library

In early 2017, Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of Sydney added three manuscripts to its significant collection of Spanish Liturgical Music Manuscripts. This Symposium is to celebrate these additions, and to mark the doubling of this collection since the last Symposium ten years ago. Jointly convened by Rare Books and the Medieval and Early Modern Centre at the University of Sydney, this Symposium brings together scholars from Spain, Taiwan, Canada, the United States and Australia. Rare Books is hosting a Reception which will include a book launch, and a short concert of excerpts from the manuscripts. The book, “Mapping Processions: Four Sixteenth-century Spanish Music Manuscripts in Sydney, is by the keynote Speaker Dr David Andrés Fernández (Spain).

When: 14 June 2018; 4:00pm – 8:00pm

15 June 2018; 9:30am – 5:00pm

Where: Fisher Seminar Room, Level 2

Keynote Speaker: Dr. David Andrés Fernández (Spain)

Register – 14th June

Register – 15th June 

Guided Exhibition Walk: Phyllis Kaberry and the Sepik

Phyllis Kaberry

The Phyllis Kaberry exhibition is on but we would like you to join us for a guided exhibition walk.

When: 4 July; 1 –1:45pm

Where: Fisher Library, level 3 and SciTech Library

Speakers: Dr Jude Philp, Senior Curator at University Museum and Nyree Morrison, Senior Archivist at University Archives

This guided walk will be conducted through the exhibition currently on display in the Fisher Library Level 3 and the SciTech Library. The exhibition was curated by anthropologist Diane Losche from the collections of Sydney’s Anthropology Department held by Rare Books and Special Collections, University Archives and the Macleay Museum. It focuses on Sydney anthropologist Phyllis Kaberry to commemorate the inscription of the Anthropological Field Research and Teaching Records, University of Sydney, 1926-1956 into the UNESCO Memory of the World Australian

Register here

More about Phyllis Kaberry and the Sepik:

In 1923 at a meeting of the international Pan-Pacific Congress at the University of Sydney the Australian government was urged to establish a Department of Anthropology and to fund urgent anthropological research in the region to counter the devastating effects of colonisation. The University of Sydney took up the challenge, instituting the first Department of Anthropology in the Australian-Pacific region with the appointment of AR Radcliffe Brown in 1926.

Many of the first generation of men and women who were taught at Sydney worked in isolation for periods of a year to eighteen months in areas where English was not spoken, in places not inscribed on maps, and with limited contact with people outside the community they were studying. For their work they were obliged to learn map making, linguistics and medical skills alongside their anthropological training.

The University’s Archives and Macleay Museum today look after the enormous wealth of information that these anthropologists produced from their interactions with Australian Aboriginal and Pacific peoples. For this exhibition we have focussed on the work of Phyllis Kaberry, the first female professional anthropologist to emerge from the Department.

This is a joint exhibition between Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of Sydney Library, University Archives and Museums to commemorate the inscription of the Anthropological Field Research and Teaching Records, University of Sydney, 1926-1956 into the UNESCO Memory of the World Australian Register.

The exhibition is being showcased on level 3 of Fisher and Sci Tech Libraries until August 2018.

Women in Wikipedia

Women in Wikipedia

Celebrate Women’s History Month by joining Sydney University Press and the University of Sydney Library for a Wikipedia edit-a-thon on Tuesday 20 March, 2018.

Women make up just 12% of Wikipedia contributors and are 16% of individuals profiled, which means there is a gender imbalance on the platform. To combat this, we will be editing Wikipedia together to improve the representation of Australian women. No experience needed: there will be training, cheat sheets, references and roving Wiki experts on-hand – plus snacks! Join us and help change the future of Wikipedia. Register here.

Exhibition: The life and music of Tommy Tycho

Tommy Tycho

The Conservatorium Library showcases researcher and PhD candidate Samuel Cottell’s The Life and Music of Tommy Tycho in a newly opened exhibition. View Tommy Tycho’s career, spanning radio, television and performances at the newly opened Sydney Opera House (in 1973), the opening of the Sydney Entertainment Centre (1983) and many more live concerts and performances.

Tommy Tycho
Tommy Tycho

Curated by Samuel Cottell (PhD)

When: 10 August – 10 October 2016

Where: Conservatorium of Music Library, Glass Space & Glass Case

Further features of the exhibition include key examples of Tycho’s musical output, featuring LP and 45’ recordings, samples of his handwritten sheet music (arrangements and compositions); commercial sheet music, trade journals, concert programs, photographs of Tommy Tycho as well video footage of him performing with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra on the ABC music program, My Music.

Gain a deeper understanding of Tycho’s musical style, output and contribution to Australian music from 1951 when he first arrived in Australia to 2007, when he received an Honorary Doctor of Music from the University of Sydney.

The curator

Samuel Cottell (PhD) focuses his research on the mediation and consumption of ‘light music’ in Australia from 1951-1983. Following the life and career of Tommy Tycho his research addresses a central theme of Tycho’s life; adaptability.

 

Fisher and Law Libraries go 24/7!

FB-banner-247v4Following the successful launch of The Quarter, Bosch and Camden Commons at the start of Semester 1, Fisher and Law libraries will be open 24/7 from the start of Semester 2. Great news for students with no hanging around at 10pm to get into the small level 3 space. Staff can also take advantage of this new service. Students and staff will have:

  • access to all collections including 2 hour loans and holds
  • 2713 study spaces
  • print/copy/scan facilities
  • bookable discussion rooms
  • kitchen facilities
  • self-issue machines to borrow books
  • self-service returns.

Both libraries are going to be staffed by security personnel only, which means that some of the library services are not available, including:

  • bonus and interlibrary loan pick-ups
  • help through staffed Information and ICT points
  • SYDPAY card encoding
  • paying fines in person.

Please remember to bring your student or staff card as you will need this to access the building. If you have any more questions, please ask a member of staff.