Rare Bites: The Renaissance of Euclid’s Elements

Illustration from Euclid text

This talk is focused on the Preclarissimus liber elementorum Eulidis (1432), the earliest Latin edition of Euclid’s Elements printed in Europe. Through this work, Dr Kotevska will discuss the re-emergence of the Elements in the Renaissance after its long disappearance from European culture in the Middle Ages. Those who tasked themselves with restoring Euclid’s mathematical works in the Renaissance variously described their project as one of revival, restitution and instauration. Who were these restorers of ancient learning whose ambition it was to return the Elements to its place as a cornerstone of mathematical learning? And what, in their view, made Euclid so obvious a candidate for intellectual consideration?

When: 25 October 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room (218)

Speaker: Dr Laura Kotevska

Register here

This talk will be presented by Dr Laura Kotevska, a lecturer at The University of Sydney, appointed in the Department of Philosophy and the Education Portfolio in the Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Her research concerns the intersection of moral philosophy and mathematics in the early modern era.

Rare Bites is a series of informal and entertaining 30 minute lunchtime talks held monthly during semester. “The Renaissance of Euclid’s Elements” is the sixth talk in Rare Bites 2018 series. If you want to learn about some of the treasures and lesser-known gems within Rare Books & Special Collections at the University Library, this is your opportunity.

https://news.library.sydney.edu.au/rare-books-the-art-of-mathematics/

Rare Books: Centenary of Architecture Exhibition

Architectural drawings

The Library wishes the Faculty of Architecture a Happy 100 Year Anniversary! With the introduction of an Architecture degree at the University of Sydney in 1918, opportunities were created for Australians to contribute to the architectural landscape.

We have two small exhibitions featuring the Faculty’s early years:

The SciTech Library displays the academic work of three women graduates – Rosette Edmunds (1924), Marjorie Holroyde (née Hudson) (1924) and Helen Turner (1930).

Fisher Library features the childhood drawings of Leslie Wilkinson, the first Professor of Architecture at the University from 1919 to 1947,  as well as his professional architectural plans including a commission for a house in Boambillee Avenue, Vaucluse and his illustration for the Circular Harbour scheme.

The exhibition runs from 4th September to 19th October. Viewers are welcome to draw their own conclusion between Wilkinson’s Punch magazine cover and the gargoyles around the Main Quad.

 

Architectural drawings

 

Rare Bites: Orientalism in Thomas Allom’s Engravings

section of Thomas Allom's Orientalist image

Orientalist painting was one of the many genres of the 19th Century art. Thomas Allom (1804-1872) was a well-known British illustrator in the 19th Century. In Allom’s publication — China Illustrated, there are 75 steel engravings of original sketches of Chinese social habits, scenery and architectures. Orientalism shaped how Allom depicted about things and what Allom understood about Chinese society. Jenny’s talk will refer to art historian Linda Nochlin’s groundbreaking essay The Imaginary Orient to discuss orientalism in Thomas Allom’s engravings.

When: 23 August 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room

Speaker: Jenny Zhijun Yang

Rare Bites is a series of informal and entertaining 30 minute lunchtime talks held monthly during semester. “Orientalism in Thomas Allom’s Engravings” is the fourth talk in Rare Bites 2018 series.

If you want to learn about some of the treasures and lesser-known gems within Rare Books & Special Collections at the University Library, this is your opportunity. Audience attendance is free for all, please register here.

About the speaker:

Jenny Zhijun Yang is the curator of  a pop up exhibition currently on display in the Fisher Library on Level 4: Perspectives of an outsider: Thomas Allom’s fascination with 19th century China. Jenny is a postgraduate student studying Master of Art Curating at the University of Sydney. She graduated from the University of Auckland with a Bachelor of Arts in history and Asian studies in 2017, and was awarded the Summer Research Scholarship of the University of Auckland. Jenny is currently a gallery host at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and was previously a gallery assistant at the Auckland Art Gallery. She co-curated the Giuseppe Castiglione Print Exhibition(宫廷画师郎世宁)at the George Fraser Gallery in collaboration with the Auckland Art Gallery Foundation and the National Museum of Taiwan. Moreover, Jenny has volunteered for many cultural institutions such as the Auckland War Memorial Museum, the Confucius Institute in Auckland, the Powerhouse Museum, the Verge Gallery and the Sydney Biennale. Jenny has a Chinese heritage and her global perspective was refined through exchanging to the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, attending a summer school at Sciences Po, Paris and doing an internship in Dublin, Ireland.

Rare Books and Special Collections Symposium: a Celebration of Music Manuscripts

Sydney University Library

In early 2017, Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of Sydney added three manuscripts to its significant collection of Spanish Liturgical Music Manuscripts. This Symposium is to celebrate these additions, and to mark the doubling of this collection since the last Symposium ten years ago. Jointly convened by Rare Books and the Medieval and Early Modern Centre at the University of Sydney, this Symposium brings together scholars from Spain, Taiwan, Canada, the United States and Australia. Rare Books is hosting a Reception which will include a book launch, and a short concert of excerpts from the manuscripts. The book, “Mapping Processions: Four Sixteenth-century Spanish Music Manuscripts in Sydney, is by the keynote Speaker Dr David Andrés Fernández (Spain).

When: 14 June 2018; 4:00pm – 8:00pm

15 June 2018; 9:30am – 5:00pm

Where: Fisher Seminar Room, Level 2

Keynote Speaker: Dr. David Andrés Fernández (Spain)

Register – 14th June

Register – 15th June 

Guided Exhibition Walk: Phyllis Kaberry and the Sepik

Phyllis Kaberry

The Phyllis Kaberry exhibition is on but we would like you to join us for a guided exhibition walk.

When: 4 July; 1 –1:45pm

Where: Fisher Library, level 3 and SciTech Library

Speakers: Dr Jude Philp, Senior Curator at University Museum and Nyree Morrison, Senior Archivist at University Archives

This guided walk will be conducted through the exhibition currently on display in the Fisher Library Level 3 and the SciTech Library. The exhibition was curated by anthropologist Diane Losche from the collections of Sydney’s Anthropology Department held by Rare Books and Special Collections, University Archives and the Macleay Museum. It focuses on Sydney anthropologist Phyllis Kaberry to commemorate the inscription of the Anthropological Field Research and Teaching Records, University of Sydney, 1926-1956 into the UNESCO Memory of the World Australian

Register here

More about Phyllis Kaberry and the Sepik:

In 1923 at a meeting of the international Pan-Pacific Congress at the University of Sydney the Australian government was urged to establish a Department of Anthropology and to fund urgent anthropological research in the region to counter the devastating effects of colonisation. The University of Sydney took up the challenge, instituting the first Department of Anthropology in the Australian-Pacific region with the appointment of AR Radcliffe Brown in 1926.

Many of the first generation of men and women who were taught at Sydney worked in isolation for periods of a year to eighteen months in areas where English was not spoken, in places not inscribed on maps, and with limited contact with people outside the community they were studying. For their work they were obliged to learn map making, linguistics and medical skills alongside their anthropological training.

The University’s Archives and Macleay Museum today look after the enormous wealth of information that these anthropologists produced from their interactions with Australian Aboriginal and Pacific peoples. For this exhibition we have focussed on the work of Phyllis Kaberry, the first female professional anthropologist to emerge from the Department.

This is a joint exhibition between Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of Sydney Library, University Archives and Museums to commemorate the inscription of the Anthropological Field Research and Teaching Records, University of Sydney, 1926-1956 into the UNESCO Memory of the World Australian Register.

The exhibition is being showcased on level 3 of Fisher and Sci Tech Libraries until August 2018.

Bright sparks: women in struggle

Where: Fisher Library level 3 and SciTech exhibition space

Our new exhibition Bright sparks: women in struggle features feminist authors from the Library’s East Asian Collection, to commemorate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month.

We have chosen authors from three countries on which our East Asian Collection focuses, and selected important works written by them. All of them are/were fierce fighters for women’s liberation, whose activism and written works continue to inspire many around the world today.

Find more about our East Asian Collection at https://library.sydney.edu.au/collections/east-asian/