Films At Fisher – final movie of the semester: Sergeant York

Films At Fisher proudly presents the final installment in this semester’s film series:

Sergeant YorkSergeant_York_1941_Poster

(US/1941) Dir. Howard Hawks

 

When: Tuesday 30 June; 5:30pm

Where: Fisher Library F03, Level 2, Exhibition Space

 

“I figured them guns was killin’ hundreds, maybe thousands, and there weren’t nothin’ anybody could do, but to stop them guns. And that’s what I done.”

Gary Cooper was never better than in this as a hillbilly turned all American hero. Ostensibly concerning WW1, the film’s release shortly before the bombing of Pearl Harbor transformed it into both stirring wartime propaganda and a box office smash.
The Films At Fisher series will be continuing on 4 August 2015, 5:30pm with the all time classic African Queen featuring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn.

 

For updates on social media: #FilmsAtFisher; #FisherLibrary

Exhibition: Highlights and Lowlifes – 29 June to 31 August

An exhibition on the Australian Holdings in the Detective Fiction Collection

Rare Books and Special Collections will be hosting a display of some of the Australian works held in the Detective Fiction Collection.

When: Monday 29 June to 31 August 2015, 9:00am – 5:00pm

Where: Rare Books Reading Room, Fisher Library F03, Level 1Covers from the books: ‘Cocaine Blues (Kerry Greenwood, 2012), ‘Death Wears a Lady’s Smile’ (Don Haring), ‘The Dying Trade’ (Peter Corris, 1980), ‘Still Murder’ (Finola Moorhead, 1991),’ Grim Pickings’ (Jennifer Rowe, 1987)

The Detective Fiction Collection began informally in the 1960’s following a donation to the Library, which contained a large number of Penguin crime paperbacks. More titles were extracted from later donations until, in 1974, the Library bought a major American collection of detective fiction (3,500 titles), many of them valuable first editions. This purchase so pleased Frederick May (then the University of Sydney’s Professor of Italian) that he donated 1,200 of his own crime fiction books, with the Library purchasing another 800 titles from his estate in 1978. At this time, the collection grows by donation, a little purchasing, and by the addition of NSW titles received on legal deposit.

The Detective Fiction Collection began informally in the 1960’s following a donation to the Library, which contained a large number of Penguin crime paperbacks. More titles were extracted from later donations until, in 1974, the Library bought a major American collection of detective fiction (3,500 titles), many of them valuable first editions. This purchase so pleased Frederick May (then the University of Sydney’s Professor of Italian) that he donated 1,200 of his own crime fiction books, with the Library purchasing another 800 titles from his estate in 1978. At this time, the collection grows by donation, a little purchasing, and by the addition of NSW titles received on legal deposit.

 

Collecting Crime

The Detective Fiction Collection is the biggest of its kind in Australia and is a major research resource for students of the genre, and of Australian literature, social studies and popular culture in general. Although called “detective fiction”, crime fiction would be a more apt term to describe the works held. Holdings run the gamut of the genre, ranging over murder and detective stories, spy fiction, psychological thrillers and police procedurals. All publishing formats are included, including variant editions, covers and multi-media. True crime material is not collected.

 

Australian holdings on display

The Australian holdings in this collection form a major part of its strengths. Crime in all its permutations has existed in our fiction since Australia’s days as a penal colony. The display will showcase the 19th century crime stories of writers such as John Lang, Marcus Clarke and Fergus Hume (“Mystery of a Hansom Cab”); the early Boney novels of Arthur Upfield; the pulp fiction explosion of the mid-20th century; the strength of Australia’s forgotten female crime writers from the 19th century such as Ellen Davitt and Mary Fortune through to the 20th century’s now unremembered stars such as Pat Flower, Pat Carlon, Margot Neville and June Wright. Also on display are examples of the most recent flowering of Australian detective fiction, beginning with Peter Corris and including Peter Temple, Barry Maitland, Claire McNab et al.

 

For updates on social media: #RareBooks; #FisherLibrary

 

Films At Fisher: Fourty Thousand Horsemen – 23 June

“They fought and suffered to emerge triumphant – the greatest cavalry force of modern times”

 

The Films At Fisher Series proudly presents:Forty_Thousand_Horsemen

Forty Thousand Horsemen

(AUS/1940) Dir. Charles Chauvel

Charles Chauvel was Australia’s first major film director. Depicting the actions of Australia’s Light Horse Regiment in Palestine in WW1, the film contains some striking action sequences.

Fisher Library F03

Level 2 Exhibition Space

5:30 pm

 

#FilmsAtFisher

For staff and students

Check out our other films in the series: Films At Fisher complete program

Films At Fisher: La Grand Illusion (Fr/1937) – 16 June

“My chief aim is to express the common humanity of men” – Jean Renoir

The Films At Fisher Series proudly presents:220px-GrandeIllusion

La Grand Illusion

(Fr/1937) Dir. Jean Renoir

Often dubbed the ultimate anti-war film by the greatest of all French film-makers, La Grande Illusion is one of the greatest masterpieces of world cinema. Set in a German POW camp in WW1, the film is sympathetic to all of its characters whilst portraying tensions of nationality, class and race.

Fisher Library F03

Level 2 Exhibition Space

5:30 pm

 

#FilmsAtFisher

For staff and students

Check out our other films in the series: Films At Fisher complete program

New exhibition: ZEEN by Leigh Rigozzi

This exhibition in Fisher Library is the next in the ongoing series of art projects Ex Libris Fisherarium curated by Associate Professor Michael Goldberg. The projects comprising work by staff, alumni and associates of Sydney College of the Arts are themed around the idea of ‘the book’ in all its historical and contemporary manifestations. Read more >

 

 

Exhibition: Ex Libris Fisherarium art series

Data RetentionEx Libris Fisherarium is an ongoing series of art projects curated by Associate Professor Michael Goldberg. The projects comprising work by staff, alumni and associates of Sydney College of the Arts are themed around the idea of ‘the book’ in all its historical and contemporary manifestations.

Project: Data Retention by Gianni Wise

Artist’s Statement
With the proliferation of data networks, the human mind always find ways to ‘wire-up’ new connections between itself, objects, ideas, events and the world. I use wires and books as a form of ready-made art that work as props for memory. Objects external to the mind can trigger memory and make connections. I am interested in this interplay between mind and external world. When Umberto Ecco claimed in the Name of The Rose (1988): “Wanting connections, we found connections always, everywhere, and between everything” he refers to a world ‘exploding’ in a whirling network of interrelationships where everything (appears to) point to everything else, everything explains everything else.

Curator’s Statement
Gianni Wise’s installation has its menacing aspects. The title, ‘Data Retention’, might well refer to current government policies regarding the retention of metadata – the harvesting from telecommunications networks of personal information by law enforcement agencies – ostensibly to protect the public from acts of terrorism. Indeed, the installation itself displays a number of sinister ‘packages’. Perhaps they hold data. But they also disturbingly resemble IEDs (or ‘improvised explosive devices’). The ‘connections’ Wise refers to carry the potential to penetrate deep into our personal lives, challenging privacy and potentially violating fundamental rights. In this sense, the installation reflects on the threat of data retention exposing our personal lives ‘like an open book’. Wise’s use of ambiguously wired devices may equally suggest the mind’s desire to invent ‘paranoid’ connections where there are none.

Dates: 23 February to 26 March 2015
Where:
Levels 2, 3 and 4 exhibition cabinets, Fisher Library North
Cost: FREE and open daily to the public
Times: Opening times vary, please check the website

For details of past and current projects, connect with Ex Libris Fisherarium on Facebook.