HeadOn photo exhibition: Mongolian Youth

26/04/2016

“It’s all going so fast,”sighs Gerelkhuu, a 26 year old artist living in Ulaanbaatar. “We have to remember who we are and to be careful not to lose our soul. If we don’t know who we are, we don’t know where we’ll go.”

When: 26 April – 30 May 2016

During a live performance of the rock band Mohanik, interior designer Enerel, 26, paints on a wall of the Glamour art gallery in downtown UB. In 2013, Enerel who used to live and study for 10 years in the US decided it was time to return to Mongolia. “More and more people are coming back” she said “bringing back what they learned abroad”.
During a live performance of the rock band Mohanik, interior designer Enerel, 26, paints on a wall of the Glamour art gallery in downtown UB. In 2013, Enerel who used to live and study for 10 years in the US decided it was time to return to Mongolia. “More and more people are coming back” she said “bringing back what they learned abroad”.

Where: Fisher Library Level 2 Corridor 208

Based in Brussels, Belgium, Marika Dee is a self-taught freelance documentary photographer. Originally, she worked as a jurist in international law and only discovered photography at a later age.
Her work explores social issues and youth culture.

As Mongolia is changing at a frantic pace and finding itself at the forefront of globalisation, its young urban generation is trying to keep up and figure out its identity.

Over the last few years Mongolia has experienced an unprecedented economic growth, driven by the massive development of mineral mining. With half of Mongolia’s 2.8 million living in the country’s capital and largest city Ulaanbaatar and more than half of the national population under the age of 30, the country has a young and increasingly urban population.

Almost 25 years after the democratic revolution that ended the communist era when Mongolia was a satellite state of the Soviet Union, a whole country is changing and its young urban generation is searching for an identity, trying to negotiate the difficult balance between the forces of globalization and the preservation of tradition.

If you like this exhibition, why not check out the HeadOn exhibition in the Law Library foyer on clouds (Photos by Daniel Arnaldi)

#headon #usydlibrary #mongolia #FisherLibrary

Ex Libris Fisherarium: Persons of Interest

23/11/2015

PhD candidate Glenn Wallace and UNSWAD academic Dr Katherine Moline give us an intriguing insight into the machinations of ASIO and the Cold War era, writes Dr Michael Goldberg.

When: 2 November 2015 – 2 December 2015

Where: Fisher Library F03 Levels 2,3, and 4

Personsofinterest_pic1For over 40 years, Australia’s Security and Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) seized books that were deemed subversive in raids on the homes of people suspected of conspiracy. In recent years ASIO files documenting the activities of certain ‘Persons of Interest’ have been released.

For this iteration of Ex Libris Fisherarium, ‘Era of Surveillance’ maps where confiscated texts are located in Fisher Library. Viewers are invited to explore the Library as a space where art, architecture, politics, knowledge and power converge.

Era of surveillance: Persons of interest / Family
Artists: Katherine Moline and Glenn Wallace

 

#Asio

#sureveillance

#Sydney_library #ExLibrisFisherarium

ANZAC centenary: Stories of War

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When: 24 April 2015 – 1 February 2016

Where: Fisher Library F03, Exhibition Space Level 2

 

During World War I the University of Sydney played a unique role in the War effort, with the expertise of its academic staff and students in high demand. The members of the University responded with enthusiasm and bravery, with 200 students and 36 staff on active service overseas by the end of 1915.

As the war progressed, so too did the need for qualified doctors, engineers, scientists and veterinarians. As early as 1916, the University recognised the importance of honouring and memorialising the efforts of its community and the lives lost, and began to collect letters, photographs, records, stories and publications.

Drawn primarily from the University Archives and Rare Books and Special Collections, with contributions from the Macleay Museum and the Faculties of Medicine and Education and Social Work, this exhibition explores the nuanced and varied ways in which the University, and its men and women, experienced, understood and responded to World War I.

#LestWeForget #Sydney_library

Ex Libris Fisherarium: Ontologías y Códices

Sydney College of the Arts proudly presents:

Ontologías y Códices

Artist: David Corbet

Curated by: Dr. Michael Goldberg

 

When: 22 Sep – 29 Oct 2015Entre irse y quedarse

Where: Fisher Library F03, Levels 1,2 and 3

“This exhibition is inspired by my adventures in the worlds of hispanic literature, poetry, song and art-making. Drawing from diverse sources, it is a personal homage to the vitality and richness of the worldwide cultures expressed and celebrated predominantly in the Spanish language – la lengua española. Such an assemblage constitutes, in a sense, a series of indices or, in a library context, codices. Among the random we seek order and likeness, we may find seriality and continuity of meaning. My studio practice and research into language systems has pursued this notion of seriality, subtitling an earlier exhibition ‘Ontologies for a small planet’. Among these disparate references my own studio work is interspersed, largely on paper, ranging from etchings and drawings to notebooks and notations.” – David Corbet

 

Las vidas de otrosThe exhibition is made up of three parts:

Level 1
“Entre irse y quedarse”
(English: “Between going and staying”)This display is inspired by the text of a poem by the late Mexican Nobel Laureate Ocavio Paz, and the late Catalan printmaker Antoni Tàpies.

Level 2
“Las vidas de otros”
(English: “The lives of others”)This display is a collection of works, books and objects obliquely exploring our human power relationship with animals, through ontologies of classification, patterning and adornment.

Level 3
“La lotería de la existencia”
(English: “The lottery of existence”)This display celebrates ontologies of chance, of religion and mysticism, and of altar-making. It explores how objects can become imbued with ritualised power through their organisation, and transformations of meaning brought about by context.

 

Rare Books Exhibition: Circumstances of Interest

2/10/2015

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Travel diaries, journals and logs from Fisher Rare Books and Special Collections

 

When: 2 October – 31 December 2015

Where: Fisher Library F03; Level 3 Corridor

 

For long-distance travelers in the 19th and early 20th centuries, keeping a journal was a popular method of keeping oneself gainfully occupied during long months spent at sea.

Through a selection of manuscript travel diaries, journals and logs from Fisher Rare Books and Special Collections, this new exhibition provides a window (or, a porthole) into the 19th century shipboard experience.

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Read more on the Rare Books blog

#RareBooks #Sydney_library

 

Exhibition: Ex Libris Fisherarium (14 Aug – 17 Sep)

Ex Libris Fisherarium

Curated by Michael Goldberg

When: 14 August to 17 September; during Library opening hours

Where: Fisher Library, Levels 2,3 and 4

 

The fool dʌθ bounce, the speculator dʌθ fall and the esopterodactyl?

 

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Nicholas Dorey

Artists:

Nicholas Dorey: Poisons on the people’s path (PPP)

Shane Haseman: CALL 688.7 3

Richard Kean: Dimensional Poetics

Have you ever had a conversation with someone where you knew what they were saying was objectively interesting but you couldn’t for the life of you figure out what on earth they were talking about? Art often creates languages which preclude the uninitiated. This could be called Art for it’s own sake or even intellectual terrorism if you’re prone to hyperbole. But Art’s role is not to polish society’s low hanging fruit. It is to cut down the fruit forest to build a synthetic fruit scent mausoleum for the fruit, which was once everyone’s, and now belongs to a rich old white man in order for him to prove how rich he is through the acquisition of something inherently worthless. Makes sense? No? Good!

All three artists have a tendency to confound, not through their disregard or contempt for a populist audience but simply by the fact that they have very particular interests. This befuddlement will no doubt continue in these small glass cabinets. Richard is matter doodling like Pythagoras with the intersections of Fibonacci number theory through the design process of electro magnetic coils and energy recycling gliders. Nick will cobble together something which seems vaguely mystical if not a little smug and overly esoteric, and Shane will round it out with something equally perplexing and erudite but in a cheeky and delightful suede patches on the elbows kind of way.

Shane, Richard and Nick are all bona fide artist with real university degrees who do real Art things all the time but more importantly they are good people and isn’t that what really matters?

 

Enquiries: Michael Goldberg 0416 287 283