True to Type

If you have ever created a digital document, chances are you’ve come across the terms Italic, Roman, and Sans Serif.

This exhibition tells the story of these three enduring letter-form classifications, through early examples drawn from Rare Books & Special
Collections.

When: 25 October 2018 – 31st January 2019

Where: Fisher Library, Level 3  Corridor & SciTech Library, glass cabinets

Indonesian music exhibition

Promo kantilan A

This exhibition celebrates the Conservatorium’s longstanding relationship with gamelan music and dance traditions of Indonesia. Gamelan music is the traditional ensemble music of Bali. It consists mainly of percussion instruments.

The study and performance of Balinese gamelan music has been an active component of Conservatorium of Music life since 1999. This exhibition highlights current research by Niall Edwards-FitzSimons on Acehnese dance, the repatriation of ethnographic recordings from the early twentieth century and the influence of gamelan on composition students at the Conservatorium.

When: 2 April – 26 May 2018
Where: Conservatorium Library
Contact: admin.library@sydney.edu.au

Women in Wikipedia

Women in Wikipedia

Celebrate Women’s History Month by joining Sydney University Press and the University of Sydney Library for a Wikipedia edit-a-thon on Tuesday 20 March, 2018.

Women make up just 12% of Wikipedia contributors and are 16% of individuals profiled, which means there is a gender imbalance on the platform. To combat this, we will be editing Wikipedia together to improve the representation of Australian women. No experience needed: there will be training, cheat sheets, references and roving Wiki experts on-hand – plus snacks! Join us and help change the future of Wikipedia. Register here.

New exhibition: ephemera

Photo by Jeannie Ho as part of the ephemera exhibition in Fisher Library

Experience our new exhibition in Fisher Library curated by the University of Sydney’s Master of Art Curation students.

From 19 October 2017; 9am-5pm

Where: Fisher Library, Levels 2,3,4

ephemera presents a distinct thematic experience that is inherently sensory; presenting a consideration of the ways in which art can either directly engage with a multitude of sensory engagements, or disrupt the potential to do so. Through engagement with senses, particularly touch and sound, ephemera provokes sensory experiences. This intentionally goes beyond the expected visually focused works to be found within the context of an art exhibition. While several works take a directed approach to sensations, others take a less literal approach, engaging viewers through more meditative and almost subliminal interactions.

A subtle influence on a sensational experience

Art work by Harry Seeley as part of the ephemera art exhibition in Fisher Library level 2The works and artists we have brought together gently provoke musings on the way in which we personally, internally and sensationally experience the world that surrounds us. All of ephemera’s incorporated works are all incredibly affective, however they communicate this with subtlety. They do not present an overt depiction of the sentiments they intend to convey, but rather influence the viewer on an emotive or sensational level, in a way that may not be instantly perceptible, becoming impactful through a more sustained engagement with the work in situ.

The artists

The Fisher Library segment of the exhibition presents works by Jeanie Ho and Harry Seeley. These two artists individually capture the essence of the exhibition through their incredibly delicate yet powerful works. The ephemerality encapsulated within the artworks themselves is further developed through the serendipitous encounters afforded by the library space, and the way in which it is utilised on a daily basis not purely as an exhibiting space but rather a space in which library visitors may unexpectedly encounter the works of art in situ and be affected unexpectedly by what they encounter.

A big thank you to Donna Brett and the Fisher Library staff for all your support and thank you to the artists for your hard work and great team work over the last couple of months.

Follow ephemera on Facebook.

Provocations: Avant-Garde Art in China in the 1980s

Cover image: Plate 18: Zhang Peili X? Series: No. 4 1987 Oil on Canvas; 31 1/2 x 39 3/8 in. (80 x 100 cm); private collection

An exhibition curated by Bingqing Wei and Minerva Inwald

Plate 18: Zhang Peili X? Series, 1986. Oil on Canvas; 31 1/2 x 39 3/8 in. (80 x 100 cm); private collection From Inside/out : new Chinese art / edited by Gao Minglu ; with essays by Norman Bryson ... [et al.].

Where: Exhibition Space, Level 2, Fisher Library

When: 31 August 2017- 15 July 2018.

or check out the Virtual Exhibition:

https://library.sydney.edu.au/collections/east-asian/provocations/index.html

The 1980s was a period of dramatic political, cultural, and economic change in the People’s Republic of China. During the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), socialist ideology penetrated every facet of China’s social and cultural realms. After the Cultural Revolution concluded, the Chinese Communist Party shifted towards a policy of “opening and reform.” China’s cultural authorities loosened their control over the artistic sphere, ushering in a period of discussion, debate, and artistic experimentation. For thirty years, official cultural policy had demanded that artistic production “serve the masses” and “serve politics.” In the liberal atmosphere of the mid-1980s, a new generation of path-breaking artists emerged across China, forming “avant-garde” groups collectively known as the ’85 New Wave movement. Concerned with the future of China’s artistic culture, ’85 New Wave artists critically engaged with Western artistic and philosophical concepts and experimented with artistic form, expanding and diversifying the artistic field. Supported by a coterie of art critics, theorists, and curators, these avant-garde artists held provocative exhibitions and published iconoclastic manifestoes. In 1989, the government’s violent crackdown on student protestors brought a decisive end to this period of avant-garde exploration, extinguishing the optimistic spirit of avant-gardism that characterised the 1980s.

This exhibition introduces materials relating to China’s avant-garde held in the University of Sydney Library collections, including the East Asian Collection and the Schaeffer Fine Arts Library. Focusing on important Chinese fine art periodicals donated to the University of Sydney by Professor John Clark, this exhibition explores the artworks, exhibitions, and ideas that animated the Chinese art world of the 1980s. Supplementing these primary sources with important art historical texts, this exhibition seeks to demonstrate how materials in University of Sydney Library collections can be used to explore this dynamic period of art history.

 

Exhibition: Music in and from Chinese-Speaking Communities

Photo by Dr Catherine Ingram

The Conservatorium Library will showcase Dr Catherine Ingram’s research in the upcoming exhibition Music in and from Chinese-Speaking Communities: New Research at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

When: 14 August-13 October

Where: Conservatorium Library glass cases

The exhibition encompasses the cultural connections between Australia and Chinese-speaking communities and their descendants of research engagement with music in and from Chinese-speaking communities conducted by staff and students at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. The exhibition builds on the centuries-old cultural connections between Australia and Chinese-speaking communities and their descendants, presenting new research relating to music in and from Chinese-speaking communities conducted by staff and students at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music

In particular, it will feature Chinese musical instruments and ensemble,  exploring areas of learning, teaching and performance of these instruments and groups in China and Australia. Other recent projects included in the exhibit are studies of China’s incredible ‘piano craze’, the significance of music in spectacular new Buddhist rituals in Taiwan, and the critically under-documented music of the Kam (or Dong) minority people in southwest China.

Launch event

You are invited to attend the launch on 23 August at 3.30pm, which will include light refreshments and short solo performances featuring Chinese instruments.