Free access to online reading material from SUP!

book covers

Sydney University Press have compiled some of their favourite free reading material from their own open access collection and from around the world. There is history, Australian poetry, classic children’s picture books and much more to choose from!

SYDNEY OPEN LIBRARY

In our Sydney Open Library, you’ll find all of SUP’s open access books, including history, biography, politics, literary criticism, public health and more, all free to read.

AUSTRALIAN POETRY LIBRARY

Created by the University of Sydney and the Australian Copyright Agency, the Australian Poetry Library hosts tens of thousands of poems by Australian writers, plus recordings of poets reading their work.

INDIGENOUS MUSIC OF AUSTRALIA

Several books in our Indigenous Music of Australia series have companion websites, where you can learn about the music of Indigenous communities and stream audio and video recordings of musicians performing their songs

Book cover: Fighting Nature by Peta Tait

From Sydney Open Library:

Throughout the 19th century, animals were integrated into staged scenarios of confrontation, ranging from lion acts in small cages to large-scale re-enactments of war. Fighting Nature is an insightful analysis of the historical legacy of 19th-century colonialism, war, animal acquisition and transportation.

Book Cover: Singing Bones - ancestral Creativity and Collaboration by Samuel Curkpatrick

From Indigenous Music of Australia:

Manikay are the ancestral songs of Arnhem Land, passed down over generations and containing vital cultural knowledge.

Singing Bones foregrounds the voices of manikay singers from Ngukurr in southeastern Arnhem Land, and charts their critically acclaimed collaboration with jazz musicians from the Australian Art Orchestra, Crossing Roper Bar. It offers an overview of Wägilak manikay narratives and style, including their social, ceremonial and linguistic aspects, and explores the Crossing Roper Bar project as an example of creative intercultural collaboration and a continuation of the manikay tradition.

Sydney Open Textbooks: A Pilot

Open book to as symbol for Open Access Week

Are you passionate about open access and making education more affordable for your students? Would you like to publish an open textbook for your unit of study?

We are looking for expressions of interest from academics to participate in a pilot project that aims to publish an open textbook to support any discipline taught at the University of Sydney at undergraduate or postgraduate level.

How to get involved?

If you are interested in publishing an open textbook for your course, please submit a one-page proposal by 1 December 2017. We are particularly interested in proposals for original and previously unpublished projects with multidisciplinary appeal that would lend themselves to digital delivery and contain multimedia content.

Your submission should include the following:

  • Your contact details
  • Textbook title
  • Unit of study name and student enrolment numbers
  • Description of contents, including any multimedia
  • Table of contents with brief chapter descriptions
  • Estimated length of manuscript and delivery timeline.

To submit a proposal, and if you would like more information or have any further questions, please contact Agata Mrva-Montoya, Publishing Manager, Sydney University Press on 02 9114 1456 or agata.mrva-montoya@sydney.edu.au

Sydney University Press was re-established in 2005 as an initiative of the University of Sydney Library and is a not-for-profit scholarly publisher.

Sydney University Press invites you to a Wikipedia edit-a-thon

Celebrate Women’s History Month by joining Sydney University Press and the University of Sydney Library for a Wikipedia edit-a-thon. Tuesday 28 March in Fisher Library, downstairs on Level 2, from 10am to 4pm. Please RSVP via Eventbrite: http://bit.ly/ww-17

We’ll be editing Wikipedia together to improve the representation of Australian women writers and researchers. No experience needed: there’ll be training sessions, cheat sheets, reference sources and roving Wiki experts on-hand – plus snacks!

Why?

Wikipedia has a diversity problem. Women make up just 12% of Wikipedia contributors and 16% of individuals profiled. But we can fix it! Every year during Women’s History Month, gatherings like this one happen all around the world. In Sydney, we’ll be focusing especially on Australian women writers, scientists and scholars.

When? Is it all day?

You can participate all day or join us for just an hour or two, but our short training sessions for new Wikipedians will run at 10am, 12pm and 2pm. BYO device or use a library PC (bookings essential). We will provide reference works, suggestions for subjects to work on, and Wiki editing assistance. Just bring yourself, and your suggestions if you have them!

If you can’t make it to Fisher but would like to take part, we’ll be live-tweeting the event and would love you to join in at home. We will also have experts on hand to answer questions remotely!

If you have any questions, please email sup.info@sydney.edu.au.

New book: Gardens of History and Imagination

23/06/2016

“making a garden was not only an act of settlement – it was one of hope, promising productivity and beauty and, in these creative endeavours, establishing a new life and even a new identity.” (Gretchen Poiner)

By Agata Mrva-Montoyagardens cover rgb full cover

To celebrate the bicentenary of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney University Press has released the much anticipated Gardens of History and Imagination: Growing New South Wales, edited by Gretchen Poiner, an honorary associate in the Department of Anthropology, and Sybil Jack, an honorary associate in the Department of History at the University of Sydney.

The book features ten scholars, members of the Independent Scholars Association (Sybil Jack, Janet George, Gaynor Macdonald, Ailsa McPherson, Colleen Morris, Gretchen Poiner, John Ramsland, Stuart Read, Catherine Rogers and Sue Rosen) exploring the significance of gardens in the history of New South Wales, and is richly illustrated with rarely seen images from the State Library’s Mitchell collections.

The authors explore the role of gardens in health and wellbeing, in social and cultural life, and in attempts to exercise moral control over the state’s citizens. They consider how changing fashions in garden design have reflected shifting economic, cultural and technological conditions. And they tell the stories of individual gardens and the gardeners who made them, from suburban veggie patches to grand country estates.

The book will be launched on 23 June 2016 at the Mitchell Library, the State Library of NSW.