Rare Bites: The Renaissance of Euclid’s Elements

Illustration from Euclid text

This talk is focused on the Preclarissimus liber elementorum Eulidis (1432), the earliest Latin edition of Euclid’s Elements printed in Europe. Through this work, Dr Kotevska will discuss the re-emergence of the Elements in the Renaissance after its long disappearance from European culture in the Middle Ages. Those who tasked themselves with restoring Euclid’s mathematical works in the Renaissance variously described their project as one of revival, restitution and instauration. Who were these restorers of ancient learning whose ambition it was to return the Elements to its place as a cornerstone of mathematical learning? And what, in their view, made Euclid so obvious a candidate for intellectual consideration?

When: 25 October 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room (218)

Speaker: Dr Laura Kotevska

Register here

This talk will be presented by Dr Laura Kotevska, a lecturer at The University of Sydney, appointed in the Department of Philosophy and the Education Portfolio in the Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Her research concerns the intersection of moral philosophy and mathematics in the early modern era.

Rare Bites is a series of informal and entertaining 30 minute lunchtime talks held monthly during semester. “The Renaissance of Euclid’s Elements” is the sixth talk in Rare Bites 2018 series. If you want to learn about some of the treasures and lesser-known gems within Rare Books & Special Collections at the University Library, this is your opportunity.

https://news.library.sydney.edu.au/rare-books-the-art-of-mathematics/

Rare Bites: Something Spanish – A glimpse into the Liturgical Music Manuscript collection

Since 2002 Sydney University has been building a collection of Spanish Liturgical Chant Manuscripts dating from the thirteenth to the eighteenth centuries. While on the surface these books seem to present just a collection of often barely decipherable dots on parchment they all originally had lives of their own, and hidden within them are stories, contexts and meanings. As we take a glimpse into some of these manuscripts we will rediscover some music of earlier centuries as we interrogate some of these unique artefacts and uncover some of their secrets.

When: 26 September 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room

Speaker: Jane Morlet Hardie

Rare Bites is a series of informal and entertaining 30 minute lunchtime talks held monthly during semester in 2017 and beyond. If you want to learn about some of the treasures and lesser-known gems within Rare Books & Special Collections at the University Library, this is your opportunity. Audience attendance is free. Please register here.

About the speaker: Jane Morlet Hardie is a musicologist and librarian who has been studying and writing about Spanish manuscripts and their music for more than 30 years. She has published extensively on Iberian manuscripts, sacred polyphony and liturgical chant of the Medieval and Early Modern periods. Following postgraduate study in the United States, she has given guest lectures in Spain, taught at the Universities of Michigan and Sydney and was a Senior Fulbright Scholar at Harvard where she wrote a book on Spanish Lamentations sources and their music.

Rare Bites: Something Spanish

Rare Bites: Orientalism in Thomas Allom’s Engravings

section of Thomas Allom's Orientalist image

Orientalist painting was one of the many genres of the 19th Century art. Thomas Allom (1804-1872) was a well-known British illustrator in the 19th Century. In Allom’s publication — China Illustrated, there are 75 steel engravings of original sketches of Chinese social habits, scenery and architectures. Orientalism shaped how Allom depicted about things and what Allom understood about Chinese society. Jenny’s talk will refer to art historian Linda Nochlin’s groundbreaking essay The Imaginary Orient to discuss orientalism in Thomas Allom’s engravings.

When: 23 August 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room

Speaker: Jenny Zhijun Yang

Rare Bites is a series of informal and entertaining 30 minute lunchtime talks held monthly during semester. “Orientalism in Thomas Allom’s Engravings” is the fourth talk in Rare Bites 2018 series.

If you want to learn about some of the treasures and lesser-known gems within Rare Books & Special Collections at the University Library, this is your opportunity. Audience attendance is free for all, please register here.

About the speaker:

Jenny Zhijun Yang is the curator of  a pop up exhibition currently on display in the Fisher Library on Level 4: Perspectives of an outsider: Thomas Allom’s fascination with 19th century China. Jenny is a postgraduate student studying Master of Art Curating at the University of Sydney. She graduated from the University of Auckland with a Bachelor of Arts in history and Asian studies in 2017, and was awarded the Summer Research Scholarship of the University of Auckland. Jenny is currently a gallery host at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and was previously a gallery assistant at the Auckland Art Gallery. She co-curated the Giuseppe Castiglione Print Exhibition(宫廷画师郎世宁)at the George Fraser Gallery in collaboration with the Auckland Art Gallery Foundation and the National Museum of Taiwan. Moreover, Jenny has volunteered for many cultural institutions such as the Auckland War Memorial Museum, the Confucius Institute in Auckland, the Powerhouse Museum, the Verge Gallery and the Sydney Biennale. Jenny has a Chinese heritage and her global perspective was refined through exchanging to the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, attending a summer school at Sciences Po, Paris and doing an internship in Dublin, Ireland.

Rare Bites: The circle of Willis and his circle of friends

“The circle of Willis and his circle of friends”:Thomas Willis Cerebri anatome cui accessit nervorum description et usus (Amstelodami, apud Gerbrandum Schagen, 1664)

Join us for the second talk in our Rare Bites series: “The circle of Willis and his circle of friends”: Thomas Willis Cerebri anatome cui accessit nervorum description et usus (Amstelodami, apud Gerbrandum Schagen, 1664).

When: 2 May 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room

Speaker: Associate Professor Catherine Storey, School of Medicine at the University of Sydney

Cate Storey will base her talk on the 17th century text Cerebri anatome, by Thomas Willis. This little book is now just over 350 years old and while it is best known for the exquisite drawing of the arteries at the base of the brain (drawings by Willis’ colleague, Christopher Wren), it is the new concepts of disease and terminologies like “neurology” that makes it so special. The ‘circle’ however, is possibly better known today than when the book was originally published and has a history all of its own.

Speaker:

Catherine Storey is a Clinical Associate Professor in the School of Medicine at the University of Sydney. She was a neurologist at the Royal North Shore Hospital until retirement. She has completed an MSc in the Unit of History and Philosophy of Science, and is a member of the International Society for the History of the Neurosciences. Cate has a passion for the history of neurology and the books that have contributed to this speciality.

Places are limited, register to reserve your seat.