Rare Bites: The circle of Willis and his circle of friends

“The circle of Willis and his circle of friends”:Thomas Willis Cerebri anatome cui accessit nervorum description et usus (Amstelodami, apud Gerbrandum Schagen, 1664)

Join us for the second talk in our Rare Bites series: “The circle of Willis and his circle of friends”: Thomas Willis Cerebri anatome cui accessit nervorum description et usus (Amstelodami, apud Gerbrandum Schagen, 1664).

When: 2 May 2018; 1-1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Level 2, Seminar Room

Speaker: Associate Professor Catherine Storey, School of Medicine at the University of Sydney

Cate Storey will base her talk on the 17th century text Cerebri anatome, by Thomas Willis. This little book is now just over 350 years old and while it is best known for the exquisite drawing of the arteries at the base of the brain (drawings by Willis’ colleague, Christopher Wren), it is the new concepts of disease and terminologies like “neurology” that makes it so special. The ‘circle’ however, is possibly better known today than when the book was originally published and has a history all of its own.

Speaker:

Catherine Storey is a Clinical Associate Professor in the School of Medicine at the University of Sydney. She was a neurologist at the Royal North Shore Hospital until retirement. She has completed an MSc in the Unit of History and Philosophy of Science, and is a member of the International Society for the History of the Neurosciences. Cate has a passion for the history of neurology and the books that have contributed to this speciality.

Places are limited, register to reserve your seat.

Rare Bites: Material Cultures of ‘Magic’

Rare Books Sydney University Library

Our popular Rare Bites lunchtime talks are back! The first talk will explore two fascinating Ethiopic Coptic Christian Magic Scrolls held in Rare Books and Special Collections – Who created them and how were they used? Could these objects have played a role in personal health, relationships and/or protection? Come along and learn about these wonderful objects.

When: 19 April 2018; 1:00 -1:30pm

Where: Fisher Library Level 2 Seminar Room

Places are limited, register to reserve your seat.

Quick Bites: Open-everything? Transparency in peer review

Hot on the heels of our last offering on external engagement in the humanities, arts and social sciences comes this Quick Bite focused on the concept of transparency in peer review. Register below to secure your place and keep your eyes peeled for upcoming Quick Bites throughout Semester 2…

Open-everything? Transparency in peer review

Academic publishing is changing, and fast. In a landscape of increasingly open scholarship, open peer review is gaining momentum – inviting questions about what transparency actually means and how we can achieve it.

Coinciding with Peer Review Week, this Quick Bite talk will look at emerging trends in peer review, and offer guidance in evaluating journal editorial guidelines and processes.

Hosted by the University Library in collaboration with the DVC Research Portfolio, this interdisciplinary event is primarily targeted at HDR students and ECRs, although all academic and professional staff are invited to attend.

 

Presenters: Edward Luca, Academic Liaison Librarian, University Library
Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Research Development Manager (Strategy), DVC Research Portfolio
When:  Wednesday 20 September, 12:15pm-12:45pm
Where: New Law School Annex -Seminar Room 444
Register: http://usyd.libcal.com/event/3516409

 

This presentation will be recorded. Slides will be uploaded to the Library’s Quick Bites You Tube playlist approximately one week after the event.

10 July: Frédéric Billiet: The Musiconis Project

The University of Sydney Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections proudly present:

 

Professor Frédéric Billiet’s talk on

The MUSICONIS project: Representations of sound & music in the Middle AgesFrederic Billiet

 

When: 10th July; 10:00 – 11:00 am

Where: Fisher Library, Seminar Room Level 2

Introduction by Dr. Jane Hardie (Director, International Musicological Society)

The Musiconis project (University Paris-Sorbonne, French National Research Agency – ANR) is dedicated to the study of sound within the Medieval image. Besides regular seminars (reported in a dedicated blog), a specific bibliography and a lexicon in Latin, Langue d’Oïl and Langue d’Oc, the heart of this project has been the development of database using a new model of iconographic indexation (musiconis.paris-sorbonne.fr).

RB Add.Ms. 373. 17th century. Handwritten Gregorian gradual on vellum. Spain.This model includes historical and organological information, as well as a description of the sound features in each image, and an interpretation of iconographic analogies.

The presentation focuses on the letter B of the first psalm depicting King David tuning his harp (ms. 246 D, fol. 1, BM of Charleville-Mézières). Thanks to the detailed observations regarding the proportions and the organization of the performer and his instrument on the page, as well as the reference to the commentaries of St Augustine, the research team discovered that David may actually refer to the figure of Christ, sitting on a foliage, as a metaphor of the divine Verb (musical of course, but not audible to the human ears).

For updates on social media: #RareBooks #FisherLibrary #Sydney_Library

Contact: Julie Price julie.price@sydney.edu.au  +61 2 9114 2321