Preserving our Indigenous Australian Languages

Did you know that out of the estimated 250 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages in Australia, 120 are still spoken and approximately 90% are endangered?

This year in the Library, we’ve started a project to add in additional spelling variations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages into our records.

Now you can more easily search & discover items in our collections that feature Indigenous Australian languages.

For example, whether your preferred spelling is “Kamilaroi”, “Gamilaraay” or Gamilaroi, you’ll now be able to find resources like Gagan = Colours, a picture book written for Gamilaraay language learners by Suellyn Tighe, a Gamilaraay woman and University of Sydney graduate.

“Our languages are inextricably linked to who we are. It encapsulates our identity and  connection to country whilst maintaining links to the past, present and future through our stories and songs” says Suellyn Tighe.

A selection of resources in our collections with AUSTLANG codes. From L to R: Gagan = colours by Suellyn Tighe (Language code: D23), Gamilaraay, Yuwaalaraay, guwaaldanha ngiyani = We are speaking Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay / Accompiled by the Walgett Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay Language Program. (Language code: D23 and D27), The rainbow by Ros Moriarty (Language code: N153) and Apmwe-kenhe arne = The snake’s tree by by Margaret Heffernan (Language code: C8)

This work is also timely as the United Nations General Assembly have declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019). Australian indigenous languages are increasingly recognised as a precious global resource and IY2019 is an opportunity to raise awareness and to provide an opportunity to achieve positive change through improving the promotion and preservation of these languages.  

“The importance of our languages being spoken between generations can not be undervalued or replaced. We are fortunate to live in times when technologies can assist us to ensure that our languages are not forgotten. It does not replace human interaction, though it does provide us with the opportunity and ability to ensure our and future generations have a connection to ancestral belonging and knowledge.” says Suellyn Tighe.

This project is based on AUSTLANG, an online resource developed by Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), which provides comprehensive information on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages spoken across Australia in an effort to preserve our Indigenous Australian languages and what we know about them.

This NAIDOC week, you can learn more about the languages of Australia by looking up your local language using the AUSTLANG website and searching our Library for language resources.

2019 Printer in Residence announced!

Barbara Campbell, 2016


The Library is excited to announce Artist Barbara Campbell as the 2019 Printer in Residence.

With an extensive creative practice spanning printmaking, performance, bookmaking and concept-driven enquiry, Barbara Campbell will take up residency in the Piscator Press workshop during Semester 2.

You can explore her work on her Vimeo page.

Her project ‘A Bird is in the Library’ brings together her passion for print techniques, text, libraries, and birds. It anticipates engagement with library users in an imaginative journey via letterpress and the architecture of the library and its systems.

Stay tuned for more updates coming… Watch for the birds!

Easier access to course readings

In January 2017 the Library started to implement eReserve, a system to enhance student discovery of unit of study readings and make the process easier and more efficient for academics and library staff.

eReserve will make it easier for students to find and access their readings.

What we think you will love about the new system?

Students

  • Simple and user friendly interface
  • Seamless access to readings located in one place embedded within Blackboard, no more having to check another system
  • Can see comments from your lecturer about specific readings
  • Readings are grouped into weeks that align with your lecture pattern

For Faculty staff

  • Faster processing – more control for academic staff enabling short notice additions to your lists
  • More transparency – you can see at all times the status of the reading lists (e.g. active, being processed, pending, need review)
  • Lecturers can see the number of times an item is viewed by students
  • Academics can get fast support from Library staff via the Help link
  • A system for tracking and controlling copyright and enhanced copyright reporting
  • Readings are located within Blackboard  (soon to be Canvas)
  • Various format reading resources can be uploaded (e.g. web links; AV/DVD, PDF)

Successful pilot projects

So far we successfully tested the system for the Sydney Law School, Psychology, Public Health and SLAM during Summer School and Semester 1. The response has been positive from both academics and students.

Full implementation

The Semester 2, 2017 phase will include the Sydney Nursing School and Faculty of Health Sciences and selected units of study from the University of Sydney Business School. Faculties and Schools not part of the Semester 2, 2017 phase will be transitioned to the new system Semester 1, 2018. The Library will be in contact with faculty staff before reading lists are transitioned into the new system.

 

For more information about the system please email: library.uos@sydney.edu.au

New Library Customer Service Charter

We have updated our Customer Service Charter to let you know what you can expect when we deliver our services. Our Charter includes service standards that we will measure, review and report to let you know how we are doing. It also includes expectations of client behaviour to ensure that everyone enjoys their time in our spaces.

You can view the charter here: https://library.sydney.edu.au/about/governance.html.

We welcome your feedback on our Customer Service Charter here: https://www.research.net/r/lcscharter. You can also provide suggestions and feedback about any of our Library services by going here:  https://library.sydney.edu.au/contacts/feedback-form.html

New 3D Printer and Scanner for the Digital Scholarship Studio at Fisher Library

11/12/2015

MakerBot

The Library has just taken possession of the first MakerBot Replicator 5th Gen 3D printer as well as a MakerBot Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner.

By Sten Christensen

The two pieces of equipment will begin to form part of the services that the Library can offer researchers and will be situated in the Digital Scholarship Studio on Level 5 of Fisher.

Once we’ve had the equipment installed and a number of staff trained we will be training groups of staff. There are a number of things that we obviously need to consider, like pricing and booking, and we are working on that at the moment, however we are very excited about the arrival of this technology, which offers researchers new dimensions to their research and their ability to prototype ideas.

 

Want to know more? Contact Katarina.Ferro@sydney.edu.au

#Sydney_library #makerbot