Need a desk? Book-a-Desk!

Ever wander around the Library looking for a desk? Wander no more! We extended the trial of a desk booking system for Semester 1.

Students and staff may now book an individual desk at Fisher, Law, and SciTech libraries as well as in the Quarter . As part of an extended trial, approximately 115 desks will be bookable just like a meeting room.

To book a desk for up to 8 hours, go to http://sydney.edu.au/library/book-a-desk.

Fisher and Law Libraries go 24/7!

FB-banner-247v4Following the successful launch of The Quarter, Bosch and Camden Commons at the start of Semester 1, Fisher and Law libraries will be open 24/7 from the start of Semester 2. Great news for students with no hanging around at 10pm to get into the small level 3 space. Staff can also take advantage of this new service. Students and staff will have:

  • access to all collections including 2 hour loans and holds
  • 2713 study spaces
  • print/copy/scan facilities
  • bookable discussion rooms
  • kitchen facilities
  • self-issue machines to borrow books
  • self-service returns.

Both libraries are going to be staffed by security personnel only, which means that some of the library services are not available, including:

  • bonus and interlibrary loan pick-ups
  • help through staffed Information and ICT points
  • SYDPAY card encoding
  • paying fines in person.

Please remember to bring your student or staff card as you will need this to access the building. If you have any more questions, please ask a member of staff.

HeadOn photo exhibition: Clouds

26/04/02016

“To look at a cloud is often to look into a world where impressions suggest themselves like persistent dreams and memories, you see what you think is there, what your memory is telling you it is, rather than just seeing what is there.” Daniel Arnaldi (photographer)

When: 26 April – 30 May 2016Daniel Arnaldi : Clouds

Where: Herbert Freehills Law Library Foyer

Daniel Arnaldi’s work explores the human condition through portraiture, landscape and still life using the medium of photography to illustrate the range of inner states of our consciousness.

As I was editing these images for the show I realised they reflected the process that I’ve gone through and by extension a process that everyone going through a transformative phase might experience, they have been broken up into 3 subsets each one with its own title to reflect the various stages of such transformations.

Awakenings
The beginning of an awareness often coming in the form of a shock, violent, fiery, spectacular but also foreboding and threatening.

Disquiet
An uncomfortable stage where we have to come to terms and process new information that can sometimes be difficult. Feelings of isolation, depression, melancholy can be part of this process, sometimes all you can do is just ride it out, the colours in this particular series have been intentionally chosen for this effect.

Resolutions
As the name suggests a more energised stage tempered with focus, clarity and calmness. The blues invoking a feeling of tranquility while the more defined structure of the clouds still expressing strength. In all these photos clouds are still wide open to interpretation by the viewer, I hope that you let these photos be an entry point into your own inner journey of reflection, memory and emotion.

If you like this exhibition, why not check out the HeadOn exhibition in Fisher Level 2 about Mongolian Youth (Photos by Marika Dee)

#headon #Usydlibrary #FisherLibrary

Exhibition and Event: Silent Tears

25/02/2016

“Photography has a well-regarded role for bringing the plight of silent victims into focus, providing a powerful opportunity for understanding and action. Bearing witness to the realities of these twelve women’s lives should be uncomfortable and challenging for audiences,” Belinda Mason

'Now many decades on, she was able to reveal for the first time the ongoing sexual violence she endured as a child with physical disability. She is no longer threatened by the perpetrator, yet the psychological trauma forces her to be anonymous in this project and unlike other participants reveal no further information about her experience. She is one of the many who still are trying to make sense of, and come to terms with, what happened to them, before they feel they can speak out.” -Belinda Mason with permission from the participant
photo by Belinda Mason

When: 1 March – 22 April 2016

Where: Herbert Freehills Law Library; New Sydney Law School Building F10

Accessibility information: http://silenttears.com.au/accessibility-options/

Belinda Mason’s Silent Tears reveals twelve Australian women’s haunting stories of disability and violence using saturated water to symbolise the streams of tears these survivors have silently endured.

Each participant has either experienced violence because they have disability, or has acquired a impairment, as a result of violence. Theirs is a powerful and compelling story of psychological, physical, emotional, economic, and cultural violence. The participants of the exhibition share their stories of domestic violence, forced sterilisation, psychological trauma, neglect and violence within institutions, and by family members.

“The power of Silent Tears lies in the hands of those who participate in it. Without stories there is silence.

“With the impact of my son’s death, and after having the girls and then a still born, five days before its born, and the relationship I was in with my ex-partner was violent all the time. I was treated not like a person; to me it was like an animal. I couldn’t handle it, being bashed all the time, getting cheated on by someone O loved so much. I just got tired of all that and I turned to drugs. Now as a person I know I can overcome all that life throws at me.” – Anonymous, Australia 2015
photo by Belinda Mason

Without stories told, we are voiceless. Without our stories heard, we are invisible. It is even harder when the stories are hard to hear and impossible to imagine,” said Belinda Mason.

Silent Tears is the result of three artist’s exploration of 12 women’s stories using a variety of photographic techniques and multi-media. Led by Mason, and supported by artists Dieter Kiernan (video) and Margherita Coppolino (documentary photography), audiences are immersed in the participant’s experiences to stimulate a deeper understanding of the diversity of violence, discrimination and survival.

Contact:

Belinda Mason: photography@belindamason.com Website: http://www.belindamason.com/

 

Join us for a special presentation by two of the artists, Belinda Mason and Denise Beckwith followed by a panel discussion on the issues.

Wednesday 6 April
7 to 8.30pm
Law School Foyer
Level 2, Sydney Law School
Eastern Avenue
University of SydneyThe event is free, but registration is required

#silenttears #sydney_library

“From Devil to Human Being: celebrating postwar reconciliation”

23 September 2015

An exhibition to commemorate 70 years since the end of the Asia-Pacific war.

When: 23 Sep – 31 November 2015

Where: Herbert Smith Freehills Law Library, New Sydney Law School Building F10

Curator: Susannah Smith curating the research of Yasuko Claremont, Japanese Studies, University of Sydney

Exhibition photo 2_180X267

 

The Asia-Pacific war was viciously fought on both sides and finally, ended 70 years ago.

This exhibition re-examines the legacy of the war and all efforts made to build peace and reconciliation. It highlights the efforts of individuals and groups to achieve peace and friendship between those who were once enemies. Their stories are told in these photographs.

Themes depicted in the exhibition range from meetings between former enemies, to group peace activities and sites of remembering. The exhibition also explores how the next generation comes to terms with the legacy of conflict.

Painting by HIDEICHI KAIHO, 1999

The exhibition is part of a conference project entitled Wounds, Scars and Healing: Civil Society and Postwar Pacific basin Reconciliation. Its ultimate theme is reconnecting through friendship and brotherhood which takes place from 30 September – 2 October 2015 at the University of Sydney.

 

For updates on social media:

#70yson #AsiaPacificWar #Sydney_library