Introducing…Peerpod!

‘Peerpod’ is your go-to podcast for all the insider knowledge on how to navigate uni life.

Hosted by our very own Peer Learning Advisors, the podcast is all about increasing a deeper sense of connectivity and belonging at Uni via a bi-monthly topical podcast.

We’ll be sharing stories, providing advice, and answering all the questions you have about Uni.

Listen to the podcast today!

The Peer Learning Advisors aka PLAs are all experienced students with their fingers on the pulse of student needs in real time and are best places to represent, speak to and share space with the student body. They have been trained in being a point of referral to students, offering tips on everything from where to find the best coffee on campus, to overcoming feeling isolated to using tech to support student initiatives and goals. 

Drop in for a chat with our PLAs at ThinkSpace, Bosch Commons, the Quarter, Dentistry Library, or Camden Commons.

Visualise Your Thesis

University of Sydney Visualise Your Thesis entries, 2019

Visualise Your Thesis challenges higher degree by research students to present their research in a 60 second video. The Visualise Your Thesis competition was started at The University of Melbourne in 2016 and is in its second year at The University of Sydney. Voting closed 20th August 2019.

Finalist Entries & results include:

(Winner) Cryptococcus: the Big and Small of it

Presented by Kenya Fernandes

PhD (Final Year). School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney

(Runner Up) The Ecology, Behaviour, and Evolution of Urban Syrphid Flies (Diptera: Syrphidae)

Presented by Manuel Lequerica

PhD (Year 2). School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney

(Viewer’s choice) New Pathways for Treating Chronic Pain

Presented by Claudia Natale

PhD (Year 3). Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney

Uncovering Organisational Superheroes: Working beyond the job description

Presented by Tim Mahlberg

PhD (Final Year). The University of Sydney Business School

People with disabilities in disaster-prone Indonesia

Presented by Pradytia Pertiwi

PhD (Final Year). Centre for Disability Research and Policy, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney

Heat tolerance in wheat: Plant characteristics and reflectance properties

Presented by Maria Ruz

PhD (Year 3). School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney

New characterisation methods for lubricant-infused surfaces using atomic force microscopy

Presented by Sam Peppou-Chapman

PhD (Year 3). School of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney

Roman Heads, Greek Hearts, Canaanite Souls: Culture, Identity and Social Change at Pella of the Decapolis (63 BCE to 295 CE)

Presented by Sandra Gordon

PhD (Year 2). Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, The University of Sydney

Development, implementation and evaluation of a treatment guideline for herpes simplex keratitis

Presented by Maria Cabrera-Aguas

PhD (Final Year). Sydney Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney

What we can learn on social participation of adolescents with learning disabilities from Malaysian inclusive education settings?

Presented by Hasrul Hosshan

PhD (Year 3). Centre for Disability Research and Policy, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney

To Affinity and Beyond: Interactive Digital Humans as a Human Computer Interface

Presented by Mike Seymour

PhD (Final Year). The University of Sydney Business School

Inhaled combination phage-antibiotic therapy for antimicrobial resistance bacteria

Presented by Yu Lin

PhD (Final Year). School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney

Dry eyes in breast cancer patients

Presented by Pauline Khoo

PhD (Year 3). Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney

New Systematic Review Toolkit

The Library is excited to announce the launch of our new Systematic Review Toolkit, now live on our Library website.

Are you embarking on a systematic review, but don’t know where to begin?

The Library is very excited to announce that we’ve launched our new Systematic Review Toolkit, the perfect place to get started on your research journey. 

We’ve broken down the entire systematic review process into stages, directly informed by user research. We provide overviews, tips, tools and resources at each stage, and link you to relevant University support so there is always help at hand.

Use the toolkit to navigate your way through the entire process and get the most out of appointments with your supervisors, librarians, statisticians and the Learning Centre.

To access the new Systematic Review Toolkit, visit the research section of the Library website.

Preserving our Indigenous Australian Languages

Did you know that out of the estimated 250 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages in Australia, 120 are still spoken and approximately 90% are endangered?

This year in the Library, we’ve started a project to add in additional spelling variations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages into our records.

Now you can more easily search & discover items in our collections that feature Indigenous Australian languages.

For example, whether your preferred spelling is “Kamilaroi”, “Gamilaraay” or Gamilaroi, you’ll now be able to find resources like Gagan = Colours, a picture book written for Gamilaraay language learners by Suellyn Tighe, a Gamilaraay woman and University of Sydney graduate.

“Our languages are inextricably linked to who we are. It encapsulates our identity and  connection to country whilst maintaining links to the past, present and future through our stories and songs” says Suellyn Tighe.

A selection of resources in our collections with AUSTLANG codes. From L to R: Gagan = colours by Suellyn Tighe (Language code: D23), Gamilaraay, Yuwaalaraay, guwaaldanha ngiyani = We are speaking Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay / Accompiled by the Walgett Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay Language Program. (Language code: D23 and D27), The rainbow by Ros Moriarty (Language code: N153) and Apmwe-kenhe arne = The snake’s tree by by Margaret Heffernan (Language code: C8)

This work is also timely as the United Nations General Assembly have declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019). Australian indigenous languages are increasingly recognised as a precious global resource and IY2019 is an opportunity to raise awareness and to provide an opportunity to achieve positive change through improving the promotion and preservation of these languages.  

“The importance of our languages being spoken between generations can not be undervalued or replaced. We are fortunate to live in times when technologies can assist us to ensure that our languages are not forgotten. It does not replace human interaction, though it does provide us with the opportunity and ability to ensure our and future generations have a connection to ancestral belonging and knowledge.” says Suellyn Tighe.

This project is based on AUSTLANG, an online resource developed by Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), which provides comprehensive information on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages spoken across Australia in an effort to preserve our Indigenous Australian languages and what we know about them.

This NAIDOC week, you can learn more about the languages of Australia by looking up your local language using the AUSTLANG website and searching our Library for language resources.

Life on the Margins

ThinkSpace Exhibition: From 24th June until 5th July 2019

Life on the Margins is a photographic exhibition that documents the precariousness of life in the vast, desolate landscapes of Namibia, and the effects of drought on an already arid land.

© 2019, By Antonia Mocatta. Photograph from ‘Life on the Margins’ Exhibition

Incorporating images captured on her recent overland tour through that country, Antonia Mocatta presents a glimpse into existence in its truly harsh environments. The images not only convey the splendour of the immense vistas, but a sense of foreboding that with the onset of climate change, scenes such as these may become all too familiar elsewhere in the world.  

© 2019, By Antonia Mocatta. Photograph from ‘Life on the Margins’ Exhibition

________________________________________________

Join us for our Meet the Photographer Event

Come along and meet Antonia as she details stories of her travels through Namibia and talks about her photography process.

Date: Friday 28th June

Time: 4pm – 5pm

Location: ThinkSpace

You can also visit the ‘Life on the Margins’ Exhibition at ThinkSpace from 24th June – 5th July 2019.

________________________________________________

The Library’s ThinkSpace 16:3 aspect digital wall – is a tool to enable creative teaching, learning and sharing in our technology-driven, creative play-space.

What would you use our digital wall for? We are looking for creative ways to use this technology in teaching, learning and sharing. If you have an idea, reach out to:admin.library@sydney.edu.au

________________________________________________

6 ways to use the Library’s Digital Collections in your research

A sample of the resources available through the new Digital Collection platform

The Library has launched the new Digital Collections platform making the Library’s digital resources more accessible. Over 5,600 digital items are now available to search online in one place.

Here are seven ways to use the Library’s new Digital Collections platform in your research:

1. For the first time, you can search across many of the Digital Collections

2. You can now save and sort resources according to your research projects under ‘My Collection’

3. You can view your ‘browsing history’ making it easier to find what you were previously searching for (this is automatically cleared once you leave the website for your privacy)

4. The search expands access to the Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections through making more of our digitised collections available

5. The platform has a mobile friendly interface, allowing for easier sharing and engagement

6. You can search across the text of collections like Hermes and Honi for the first time as our new system detects and uploads text from each page of our items

Browse and explore the Library’s Digital Collections.