Exhibition: The Three Phases by Alex Gawronski

The Three Pases21 August to 13 October 2014
The Three Phases is a series of 55 predominantly colour photographs mounted on gaterboard. These photos were edited down from hundreds of related others. All the photographs were taken around various Sydney University campuses especially at Sydney College of the Arts and Fisher Library my two workplaces. The photos also include reframed images of otherwise random pages within books I have discovered recently as a frequent user of the Library. Each cabinet has been arranged according to a particular book title suggesting a theme. These constitute the ‘three phases’ of the work’s overarching title; Phase One – The Construction of Reality, Phase Two – The Art Crisis and Phase Three – Archaeology as a Political Practice. There is a strong focus on the everyday in this ensemble of works that is combined at times with other more absurdist representations. This combination speaks of a certain anxiety regarding the ‘truth’ of photographic imagery in our pervasively digital age but also the freedom for constant recombination digital technology allows. Overall, the images are arranged to imply an open poetic narrative relative to the theme of each cabinet. Their arrangement over three descending floors also hints at the spatial dimension of photographs as a collective archive to be mined in ever differing ways.

Fisher Library and Sydney College of the Arts Series of Art projects
This series, curated by Associate Professor Michael Goldberg, showcases the work of Sydney College of the Arts students, staff and alumni for the wider University community.

Where: Levels 2, 3 and 4 exhibition cabinets, Fisher Library North
Cost: FREE and open daily to the public
Times: Opening times vary, please check the website

For further information contact:
Dr Michael Goldberg
E michael.goldberg@sydney.edu.au

EXHIBITION Books and Things: Collections for Pacific Studies

copyright Michael MyersCurated by Erna Lilje
24 April to 19 December 2014

This exhibition illustrates the wealth of the Library’s holdings related to Pacific Studies. It includes early printed books, maps and charts, works of natural history and fiction. The books and documents on display are complemented by artefacts from the Macleay Museum’s holdings and together they celebrate the wealth of the University of Sydney’s heritage collections.

Where: Exhibition Space, Level 2, Fisher Library
Cost: FREE and open daily to the public. Closed Public Holidays
Times: Opening times vary, please check the website

Further information
T 9036 6465
E jacqueline.grainger@sydney.edu.au

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Poetry reading by Les Murray AO

Les Murraywith an introduction by Sue Butler, Editor, The Macquarie Dictionary

We are delighted to welcome Les Murray back to Fisher Library for readings from his collections of poetry.

Les is engaged at the moment reading the proofs of the American edition of his Collected Works, to be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He says that the most he has to do is put in a comma that he should have put in years ago. Unlike Oscar Wilde who had the reverse difficulty – he struggled all morning taking a comma out and then in the afternoon put it back in again – Les thinks that the comma should always have been there, so as the afternoon wears on he will still leave it in. He agrees with Wilde however in general principle. A Murray dictum is: “When a book has reached this stage you do as little as possible because you will just end up ‘over-egging the pudding’.”

Les is heading off in May for a reading tour of Germany accompanied by his Swedish translator. He reads the English and she reads the German – although occasionally they swap. Her English has an American accent and Les’s German, according to one of his listeners, has improved. Then he presses on for more readings in London.

Les will read some old favourites and a number of new poems from a book in the making.

All are invited to attend this free event and light refreshments will be provided. This is a popular event and seats are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.

When: Tuesday 29 April 2014
Time: 5.30 for 6pm
Where: Exhibition Space, Level 2 Fisher Library
FULLY BOOKED.
If you have registered your attendance and are unable to attend please let us know via
E library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au or
T 9114 0866

 

Symposium – The Great Novels of 1814: Austen, Burney, Edgeworth and Scott

novels1814This symposium celebrates the bicentenary of four great novels published in the same year. Jane Austen is widely known and loved by a vast audience and The Great Novels of 1814 exhibition currently on display in the Fisher Library celebrates her novel Mansfield Park and works by her favourite authors: Frances Burney’s The Wanderer, Maria Edgeworth’s Patronage and Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley.

The proceedings will be chaired by Professor Margaret Harris, University of Sydney, starting at 9.30am with a welcoming morning tea during your registration. The symposium will feature papers from Professor William Christie, University of Sydney, Emeritus Professor Jocelyn Harris, University of Otago, Dr Stephanie Russo and Dr Ryan Twomey, Macquarie University, and Dr Olivia Murphy, Murdoch University.

A sandwich lunch will be provided at midday followed by a choice of activities: a screening of the film Amazing Grace, which is part of the Films at Fisher program complementing The Great Novels of 1814 exhibition, as well as the chance to visit the Nicholson and Macleay Museums.

At 5.30pm there will be a talk by Jacqui Grainger, Manager of Rare Books and Special Collections, about curating the exhibition, followed by a reception in the Exhibition Space, and a private viewing with the opportunity to talk to Jacqui more about the exhibition.

Event details

When: Wednesday 16 April 2014
Time:
9.30am – 7.30pm
Where: Seminar Room, Level 2, Fisher Library F03, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus
Cost: Free with booking required. Places are limited to 50.
RSVP by Thursday 10 April 2014
E library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au
T 9114 0866

Films at Fisher

Films at FisherThe Library is presenting a series of free film screenings for students and staff in conjunction with our current exhibition Great Novels of 1814: Austen, Burney, Edgeworth and Scott

Wednesday Program: March & April 2014
Screenings commence at 2pm in the Exhibition Space, Level 2, Fisher Library

12 March Culloden (Dir. Peter Watkins, UK, 1964. B&W, not rated) The Jacobite rebellion of 1746 is brought thrillingly to life by Watkins. Shot as if made by a documentary film crew, we see the climactic battle from both English and Scottish viewpoints resulting in an anti-war masterpiece.
19 March Barry Lyndon (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, UK, 1975, rated PG) Set against the backdrop of the Anglo-Irish conflicts of the Eighteenth Century, Barry Lyndon tells of the escapades of an Irish adventurer in both love and war. Whilst director Kubrick’s genius is undisputed (2001:A Space Odyssey, The Shining, A Clockwork Orange), it is the stellar work of John Alcott’s Oscar-winning cinematography that lingers longest in the memory.
26 March The Madness of George III (Dir. Nicholas Hytner, UK, 1994, rated PG) As King George appears to succumb to the effects of dementia, a struggle for power breaks out in court and parliament. Alan Bennett’s magnificent screenplay is brought to life by a top-notch cast including Helen Mirren, Ian Holm and the stupendous Nigel Hawthorne.
2 April Mansfield Park (Dir. Patricia Rozema, UK, 1999, rated M) Patricia Rozema brings a freshness to Jane Austen’s 1814 novel, with an emphasis on the political context of slavery and colonialism. Critic Roger Ebert said of the film “This is an uncommonly intelligent film, smart and amusing too, and anyone who thinks it is not faithful to Austen doesn’t know the author but only her plots.
9 April Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Dir. Peter Weir, UK, 2003, rated M) During the Napoleonic Wars Captain Jack Aubrey (Russell Crowe) pursues a French warship around the coast of South America. Crowe produces one of his finest performances, and Paul Bettany as his friend and chief scientist is outstanding.
16 April Amazing Grace (Dir. Michael Apted, UK, 2007, rated PG) A fine depiction of William Wilberforce’s campaign for the abolition of slavery in Britain. Ioan Gruffudd heads an excellent cast including such actors as Benedict Cumberbatch, Romola Garai and Albert Finney.