6 ways to use the Library’s Digital Collections in your research

A sample of the resources available through the new Digital Collection platform

The Library has launched the new Digital Collections platform making the Library’s digital resources more accessible. Over 5,600 digital items are now available to search online in one place.

Here are seven ways to use the Library’s new Digital Collections platform in your research:

1. For the first time, you can search across many of the Digital Collections

2. You can now save and sort resources according to your research projects under ‘My Collection’

3. You can view your ‘browsing history’ making it easier to find what you were previously searching for (this is automatically cleared once you leave the website for your privacy)

4. The search expands access to the Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections through making more of our digitised collections available

5. The platform has a mobile friendly interface, allowing for easier sharing and engagement

6. You can search across the text of collections like Hermes and Honi for the first time as our new system detects and uploads text from each page of our items

Browse and explore the Library’s Digital Collections.

Library App: Your device becomes your digital card

The Library’s updated app is your key to accessing the Library & it’s resources. The app can also be used as your digital Library card.

After user testing and feedback, the Library app has now been updated to improve user experience and integrate with the new Library Services Platform.  

Forgot your student card and want to borrow books? Download the App and use the digital card instead!

With the Library app you can also:

  • Chat Now and leave feedback 
  • Make an appointment with the Academic Liaison Librarian 
  • Book a Desk, a Study space 
  • Request items, cancel items and monitor fines 
  • Item search using device’s camera 
  • Search Library Databases  
  • Keep up-to-date with Library News & Events 
  • Interact with 360 virtual tour of Library spaces 
  • Search Library Opening hours and locations 

All in the palm of your hand!

For more information, and download the App, visit the

Download the Library App free from the App store today via the Library’s app page.

Uncover the Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections Treasures in our series of lunchtime talks

Rare Bites is a series of 30 minute lunchtime talks held monthly during semester. Each talk features an expert speaker spotlighting specific Rare Books and Special Collections resources that are part of their field of study.

The series gives the opportunity for staff & students to learn about some of the treasures and lesser-known gems within Rare Books & Special Collections.

Talk One:
More than just its prayers: A late medieval Dutch Prayer Book in Fisher Library

Our first talk More than just its prayers: A late medieval Dutch Prayer Book in Fisher Library is by Dan Anlezark- McCaughey Professor of Early English Literature and Language; Director, Medieval and Early Modern Centre; Associate Dean Research (Education) Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of English who will be talking about the book from our collection: Add. Ms. 342

[A prayer book in Latin and Dutch]. 1501. Netherlands.

Add. Ms. 342 is an unstudied late medieval prayer book in Middle Dutch and Latin. This late fifteenth-century manuscript, written on paper, is only minimally decorated, and is the kind of book that was the output of mass production in the Low Countries in the later Middle Ages. The book appears to have remained in private ownership from the time it was made until relatively recently, as is indicated by the inscription of a number of names (including those of children) up to the early nineteenth century.

This short talk will provide a brief overview of the book in its evolving historical contexts, from the time of its manufacture, until it was acquired by the Fisher Library.

Cost: Free

When: 1:00pm – 1:30pm, Wednesday 20 March 2019

Where: Fisher Seminar Room (218), level 2

Register online (places limited)

Talk Two: Illustrations to micrographs: Visualising patterns in Botany

Learning about the world around us involves observing and recognising the patterns. In science, learning is about sharing and challenging “the what” and “the how” of our observations through discussion within the classroom and with the scientific community at large.

Botanische Wandtafeln (1874-1911), RB Elephant Folio 580 2
Online at https://digital.library.sydney.edu.au/nodes/view/6401

Join Associate Professor Rosanne Quinnell from Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science discussing Botanische Wandatafeln – a series of technical scientific illustrations (1874-1911) distributed globally as teaching tools to support student learning in botany.

Reliance on these illustrations of resources fell out favour for a number of reasons including the advent of digital imaging which coincided with the explosion in the number of online resources (including the University’s eBOT collection). Re-utilising Leopold Kny’s series in a digital platform allows for an enriched dialogue about how science, in general, and botany, is communicated.

Associate Professor Rosanne Quinnell is from Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science. Dr Quinnell’s research and teaching focus on plant sciences and the use of technology-enhanced solutions to improve student learning e.g. Botany, Zoology and Human Biology virtual microscopy slide collections, eBOT botanical image repository, electron laboratory notebooks, CampusFlora apps.

Cost: Free

When: 1:00pm – 1:30pm, Wednesday 17th April

Where: Fisher Seminar Room (218), level 2

Register online (places limited)

Stay tuned for details of more upcoming Rare Bites talks throughout the year.

Rising from the East: Opera in China Exhibition

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music Library presents PhD candidate, Jing Cai’s research exhibition: Rising from the East: Opera in China.

The exhibition showcases an operatic snapshot of China today; in particular how Chinese practitioners revive western classical operas and invent new contemporary Chinese operas.

The exhibition will feature three key themes: reviving western operas in contemporary featuring: Turandot, Die Fledermaus, Rigoletto, Aida and Der Fliegende Holländer; Chinese New Commission – Jinsha River composed by LEI Lei; Operatic Data and the NCPA.

View the video here featuring Jing Cai describing her work.

When: 27 March – 27 May 2019

Where: Sydney Conservatorium of Music Library

Cost: Free

For more information on the Exhibition launch,
Wednesday 27 March 2:00pm, visit the Sydney Conservatorium of Music website

The Golden Age of Dutch Printing

In the seventeenth century, a period known as the Dutch golden age, Dutch book production led the world.

Atlas minor…noveau revue, et augmente / Gerardus Mercator (1512-94). Amsterdami, excusam in aedilus Judoci Hondii [1613]. RB 6113.1

Dutch dominance of European printing at this time can be attributed to two main factors: the Dutch Republic’s position as a centre of international trade, and its relative freedom of the press. This exhibition showcases some examples of fine Dutch printing held in Rare Books & Special Collections.

When: 18th March – 23rd September 2019

Where: Fisher Library, Level 1

How the Library can help you to master your information literacy skills

This year, the Library is offering two fully online courses developed for students to master the foundational skills in information literacy. Learn how to research like a pro – know what resources are reliable and go beyond Google for the best possible results. Both courses available are zero credit points.

The two courses include:

Fact or Fake News 

Not all information is created equal. In this course, you will learn what information is best suited for your needs. Learn how to detect bias and how to determine authority, accuracy and intended audience. You will investigate all the different ways information can be created and in turn question how to identify reliable and suitable sources. 

Access the Fact or Fake News course via the OLE canvas site.

Going beyond Google 

Sometimes Google is not enough. In this course you will develop the ability to apply universal search techniques across scholarly, government and commercial websites to become a more flexible and efficient searcher. Learn how to identify common search features on a range of websites and use them to quickly find specific sorts of information. 

Access the ‘Going beyond Google’ course via the OLE canvas site.