Australian Piano Music 1850-1950. Our Cultural Legacy Exhibition

Australian Piano music is Associate Professsor, Dr Jeanell Carrigan’s ongoing research area and this exhibition coincides with the publication of her new e-book, Australian Piano music from 1850-1950. A performer’s guide, which includes published piano music examples with recordings.

The exhibition includes newly published piano music scores written by Meta Overman, Iris de Cairos Rego, Una Bourne and more, as well as CD covers.

________________________________________________

Join us for our exhibition opening event

Date: Wednesday 7 August 2019

Time: 3:00pm

Location: Conservatorium Library

Register your attendance online

You can also visit the ‘Australian Piano Music 1850-1950. Our Cultural Legacy ’ Exhibition 5 August – 5 October 2019.

________________________________________________

Preserving our Indigenous Australian Languages

Did you know that out of the estimated 250 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages in Australia, 120 are still spoken and approximately 90% are endangered?

This year in the Library, we’ve started a project to add in additional spelling variations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages into our records.

Now you can more easily search & discover items in our collections that feature Indigenous Australian languages.

For example, whether your preferred spelling is “Kamilaroi”, “Gamilaraay” or Gamilaroi, you’ll now be able to find resources like Gagan = Colours, a picture book written for Gamilaraay language learners by Suellyn Tighe, a Gamilaraay woman and University of Sydney graduate.

“Our languages are inextricably linked to who we are. It encapsulates our identity and  connection to country whilst maintaining links to the past, present and future through our stories and songs” says Suellyn Tighe.

A selection of resources in our collections with AUSTLANG codes. From L to R: Gagan = colours by Suellyn Tighe (Language code: D23), Gamilaraay, Yuwaalaraay, guwaaldanha ngiyani = We are speaking Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay / Accompiled by the Walgett Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay Language Program. (Language code: D23 and D27), The rainbow by Ros Moriarty (Language code: N153) and Apmwe-kenhe arne = The snake’s tree by by Margaret Heffernan (Language code: C8)

This work is also timely as the United Nations General Assembly have declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019). Australian indigenous languages are increasingly recognised as a precious global resource and IY2019 is an opportunity to raise awareness and to provide an opportunity to achieve positive change through improving the promotion and preservation of these languages.  

“The importance of our languages being spoken between generations can not be undervalued or replaced. We are fortunate to live in times when technologies can assist us to ensure that our languages are not forgotten. It does not replace human interaction, though it does provide us with the opportunity and ability to ensure our and future generations have a connection to ancestral belonging and knowledge.” says Suellyn Tighe.

This project is based on AUSTLANG, an online resource developed by Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), which provides comprehensive information on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages spoken across Australia in an effort to preserve our Indigenous Australian languages and what we know about them.

This NAIDOC week, you can learn more about the languages of Australia by looking up your local language using the AUSTLANG website and searching our Library for language resources.

New Systematic Review Toolkit

The Library is excited to announce the launch of our new Systematic Review Toolkit, now live on our Library website.

Are you embarking on a systematic review, but don’t know where to begin?

The Library is very excited to announce that we’ve launched our new Systematic Review Toolkit, the perfect place to get started on your research journey. 

We’ve broken down the entire systematic review process into stages, directly informed by user research. We provide overviews, tips, tools and resources at each stage, and link you to relevant University support so there is always help at hand.

Use the toolkit to navigate your way through the entire process and get the most out of appointments with your supervisors, librarians, statisticians and the Learning Centre.

To access the new Systematic Review Toolkit, visit the research section of the Library website.

Warburton Arts and Knowledge Project: Artists in Residence at Fisher Library

This NAIDOC week the Library has been lucky enough to host Artists in Residence from Warburton in Western Australia.

The artists are visiting to celebrate the launch of the new University of Sydney digital portal of Indigenous Knowledges.

The portal is about the commitment by the University to ensure that Aboriginal knowledges are embedded in the learning, teaching and research at our University.

The small town of Warburton in remote Western Australia is home to the largest collection of Aboriginal art owned by Aboriginal people in the country, if not the world. This astonishing body of work by the Ngaanyatjarra people has been collected over the past 30 years, with the community acquiring all of the significant works being created there. Consequently, Ngaanyatjarra art is rare on the market, with the most outstanding examples sitting within the 1000 strong Warburton Art Collection, managed by the Warburton Arts Project.

This collection is a spectacular example of how Ngaanyatjarra knowledge is celebrated, remembered, made new, and shared. The Warburton Arts and Knowledge Project, by way of a digital portal of Indigenous Knowledges, interfaces these alternate world views with our current teaching pedagogies, thus allowing any student, researcher or lecturer immediate access to Indigenous Knowledges.

________________________________________________

Visit Fisher Library Foyer this Thursday 11th July to see the artists at work and chat to them about their process.

We will also be exhibiting the works from the new portal at
ThinkSpace until 19th July 2019. Visit for your chance to see some of the incredible artworks in detail on the Digital Wall.  

_______________________________________________

A new & simple way to search Library services

From document delivery, events and exhibitions to chat now and book a desk… the Library has a lot to offer students and staff.

Luckily we’ve catalogued all the different Library services available to you – which you can now easily search in one place through the Library’s home page.

There are 50 services split into five categories:

  1. Information management
  2. Library spaces
  3. Online support
  4. Research support
  5. Study and teaching support

Each service lists a description of the service, how and when you can access the service and who to contact if you need support or feedback.

So next time you are looking for a specific way the Library can help,  you can search the Library services site for more information.

Good Omens Exhibition

Rare Books and Special Collections present a pop-up exhibition of its holdings of Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, in time for the release of the new TV series Good Omens based on the book.

The volumes displayed come from the Library’s Steele collection, a comprehensive collection of complete works of leading overseas and Australian authors, anthologies, early journals, and fanzines. Mr Colin Steel – former University Librarian at Australian National University – donated his significant private collection of science fiction, fantasy, horror books, and periodicals to the University Library, of which the books displayed are a part.

The exhibition includes the very first edition of Good Omens with both authors’ signatures, along with other signed copies with various artworks, promotional materials, and reviews.

Location: Fisher Library, Level 3

Date: 31st May 2019 – 20th September 2019